Wednesday, November 25, 2009

Week 30, Day 216, November 25, 2009, Friend Potrait


Tonight we had the First Annual Gallow, and wannabe Gallow's gathering at the Chapter House in Ithaca NY.  For this day everybody is an honorary Gallow.  This is one of the Gallow wannabes.  For those of you who know this gentleman, it's a typical look for him. 

For a dark bar, I thought this photo came out fairly well.

Stay tuned next year, if you also want to be a Gallow for a day.

Lessons Learned:
  • In taking a group shot in a dark room, without a flash, on a tripod, somebody always moves.  Oh well.  It was worth a shot.
Photo details: Exposure time 1/50, Aperture f/1.8, ISO 1600, Focal Length 50 mm, 35 mm equivalent focal length 81mm, Lens Canon EF 50mm f/1.8 II, hand held.

8 comments:

Nicki said...

Thanks for letting me join the family! You are a great bunch of people!

Great shot! You have some wonderful pictures from yesterday!

Gary's third pottery blog said...

next year? mebbe next month, Dec 23rd......... :)

AB said...

Nicely captured!

jassnight said...

Who is that guy? LOL!

Mike said...

I guess I can't be too critical as it was an "in-the-moment" shot.

The only thing I'll point out is that the focus point looks like it is his chin? So his nose and eyes are out of focus, but I can count the stubble on his cheek. I would have made the bridge of his nose the focal point.

Although I suppose he might have stood up as you were taking the picture :-) Nothing you can do about that I guess.

Where you using a single-point focus? Or multi-point?

Mike

Gallow said...

Mike, you are right. That would make for a better photo.

The camera was set for a single-point focus. The center point. Do you think the multi-point would work better?

Thank you for your comments.

Steve

Mike said...

Steve,

I generally use single point focus because I'm more often then not using a lens that isn't correct for the situation, and I don't fill most of the frame with the subject.

In this case, with a tight crop all of your focus points would have been on the subject, so I think multi-point would have been best.

But if you were doing a lot of shots with wider scopes (e.g. someone standing in front of a vista, etc), then single-point is the way to go.

I do a lot of sports photography with (unfortunately) shorter than I would like lenses. So I've become adept at getting that single focus point where I want it.

Good Luck!

Mike

Mike said...

Steve,

I generally use single point focus because I'm more often then not using a lens that isn't correct for the situation, and I don't fill most of the frame with the subject.

In this case, with a tight crop all of your focus points would have been on the subject, so I think multi-point would have been best.

But if you were doing a lot of shots with wider scopes (e.g. someone standing in front of a vista, etc), then single-point is the way to go.

I do a lot of sports photography with (unfortunately) shorter than I would like lenses. So I've become adept at getting that single focus point where I want it.

Good Luck!

Mike